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Kadlec Clinic - Audiology

Contact us:

780 Swift Boulevard Suite 301
Richland, WA 99352
(509) 942-3178

Kadlec’s audiology team includes audiologists whose education and training provides them with the skills to assess and diagnose dysfunction in hearing, auditory function, balance, and related disorders. Our doctors use the latest treatments and technologies to ensure the highest quality of care in a timely, comfortable and patient-centered, patient-friendly environment. 

Audiologic rehabilitation services includes not only the selecting, fitting, and dispensing of hearing aids and other hearing assistive devices, but also the assessment and follow-up of services for persons with BAHA devices. 

The audiologist providing audiologic rehabilitation does so through a comprehensive program of therapeutic services, devices, counseling, and other hearing management strategies.


Frequently Asked Question About Hearing

My ears are ringing…what’s going on? ›

Tinnitus is a perceived sound that is not generated by an external sound source. Research tells us that tinnitus is actually generated within the brain. For example, in recent history, patients with severe tinnitus continued to perceive ringing even after the hearing nerve was severed. Ringing in the ears, or tinnitus, can be caused by many different things, from occluding wax in the ear canal to more medical concerns such as an acoustic neuroma (a rare finding).

We diagnostically investigate the auditory pathway to determine what may be causing the ringing. Currently, there is no treatment that is backed by scientific evidence. However, it is a symptom that can be managed successfully. The first step in addressing tinnitus symptoms is to obtain a hearing evaluation, if the tinnitus has been present and bothersome for 6 months un both ears. If tinnitus is only perceived on one side, this may warrant a more urgent audiological and medical evaluation.

I have a screening from work or Costco, is this sufficient? ›

A screening is not a comprehensive hearing evaluation. A comprehensive hearing evaluation measures responses to speech and tonal stimuli across multiple “pitches” using headphones/inserts in addition to a bone vibrator. The bone vibrator is diagnostically valuable in determining the type of hearing loss. Without this critical information, we cannot diagnose the hearing loss, or determine if a medical referral is necessary. 

What is the difference between an Audiologist and a Hearing Aid Dispenser? ›

The difference between an audiologist and a hearing aid dispenser is the level of education. An audiology degree requires a doctorate level of training, with a minimum of 8 years education and a minimum of 1,820 clinical hours. In the state of Washington, a hearing aid specialist must complete a two-year degree (of any disciple) or nine-month certificate program in hearing aid specialist instruction through a program approved by the Board of Hearing and Speech. With a high level of clinical and academic training, an audiologist is qualified to evaluate, diagnose, treat and manage hearing loss, tinnitus and balance disorders across the age spectrum.

My child’s not speaking, should I be concerned about hearing loss? ›

Hearing loss should be considered. If a speech delay is present, it is important to determine the status of hearing in both ears. If hearing loss is present or fluctuating (caused by intermittent middle ear fluid for example), the child will not have consistent access to speech in order to develop age appropriate speech and language. The first step is to complete a comprehensive hearing evaluation. Testing for the pediatric population is different than testing the adult population. Evaluation may involve toys and boxes that light up and play sounds. This type of testing conditions the child to "find" the sounds. If hearing is normal (or if hearing loss is identified), the child may need to follow up with a Speech Language Pathologist.

My child did not pass their Newborn Hearing Screening…what’s next? ›

There has been a recent push for universal newborn hearing screenings, completed immediately at the hospital. The purpose of this testing is to quickly identify hearing loss among this population. If the baby has failed the screening, the hospital, the Department of Health or the primary care provider will refer the patient to an audiologist who performs an Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) test. The ABR test evaluated the functional integrity of the auditory nerve at the frequencies important for speech and language development. The goal is to follow the 1-3-6 rule: screen by age 1 month, diagnostic evaluation by age 3 months, and enrolled in intervention by age 6 months.

I’m feeling dizzy…why do I need a hearing test? ›

Dizziness can be caused by many different things related to: cardiovascular, neurological, audiological systems etc. Dizziness is a broad term that can be described as lightheadedness, wooziness, unsteadiness or room-spinning vertigo. True vertigo is described as a perception of movement, and can be caused by a disturbance in the balance organ which is housed in the inner ear. The balance organ and hearing organ are both located in the inner ear, and sometimes they can both be affected. A full vestibular evaluation includes a hearing test because the test results will help determine if the dizziness is ear-related.


Services Offered at this Location:


Our Providers: Kadlec Clinic - Audiology

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Christina Durocher Au.D, CCC-A

Audiologist


780 Swift Boulevard
Suite 301
Richland WA, 99352
(509) 942-3178
509-942-2534

Map and Directions

Accepting New Patients

Curtis A. Woolf AuD

Audiologist


780 Swift Boulevard
Suite 301
Richland WA, 99352
(509) 942-3178
(509) 942-2534

Map and Directions

Accepting New Patients

Betsy Zemel Au.D

Audiologist


780 Swift Boulevard
Suite 301
Richland WA, 99352
(509) 942-3178
509-942-2534

Map and Directions

Accepting New Patients